Category: Plugins

Improve your WordPress Plugin Deployment

We hate SVN. At least most of us do. We all love GitHub (or Bitbucket, GitLab or similar). Yet, we wanna do WordPress plugins and put them up in the plugin repository.

There comes a time when everyone needs to get in touch with SVN, which is not wrong. As a developer, you should be familiar with it so that you can contribute to WordPress Core. ūüôā ¬†But using SVN to manage your plugin is a pain, especially since you probably have all development happen on a platform like GitHub. Fortunately, it doesn’t need to be like that. There are ways to deploy new plugin releases without even knowing that SVN is being used. Even if you love SVN to death, a deploy script for your plugins is worth using – let me introduce one to you in this post. (more…)

Making Your Plugin Routines Multisite Compatible

If you’ve been getting your way around with WordPress, you have probably heard of that thing called Multisite. Multiple web sites in one WordPress installation, that is. You may also call it a network of sites. If you haven’t actually used it, that’s another issue – maybe you have not (yet) come across a project where Multisite would have been the right fit. (In any case, I would encourage you to try it out on your dev environment then.)

This post is not about Multisite though. It’s about how you can make your regular plugin that you would like to write or might have written years ago compatible with Multisite. Because even if your plugin does not do anything¬†related to Multisite in any way, there are some things to take care of, in particular you need to take care of your plugin’s activation / deactivation / uninstallation routines (if you have something like it in your plugin). Otherwise you are locking out some users from using your plugin, and you certainly don’t want that, I’m sure. Now that you have read this, please don’t run away, it’s not something you need to spend days for – it might only take a few minutes, and if you don’t have any of these routines,¬†there actually is nothing else to do to make the plugin compatible (at least not for the scope of this tutorial). But now, let’s get started! (more…)

Improving WordPress workflow with YeoPress, Grunt and Bower

I’ve been developing for WordPress over a few years now. I love the simplicity of the system (compared to other content management systems) and that it is nevertheless as powerful as all of its competitors. However, one thing always annoyed me, and I bet everyone else too: Setting it up is just a pain. Not because it is in any way hard, but because it costs some time. It’s only about 10 minutes maximum,¬†but I didn’t want to invest this time doing the exact same thing for any web site I set up. Yeah, it’s just 10 minutes – but you probably heard¬†that developers are lazy. You probably set up WordPress sites as well, so I don’t need to tell you this. But there is another way which I’ll illustrate in this tutorial. I will explain how you can set up your WordPress installation by executing just one single script¬†in Terminal (you should have a basic understanding of how to use it before reading this article). Furthermore you will learn how to¬†include a WordPress starter theme that has all the important tools built-in. But now let’s get started in kickstarting your projects!

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Apply WordPress Filters the better Way

In order to have your plugin or theme customizable by other developers, you should apply a lot of filters, but of course only when it might make sense (you should empathize with fellow developers to imagine possible situations). According to the WordPress Codex, filters exist to allow others to modify the filtered content before it is processed further.

Filters are functions that WordPress passes data through, at certain points in execution, just before taking some action with the data (such as adding it to the database or sending it to the browser screen).

This is definitely the general rule you should stick to. But you cannot only modify content via filters, you can furthermore actually create content – and in some cases this is a much more efficient approach.
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How To Use Transients To Speed Up Your WordPress Theme

One out of all the WordPress APIs is often overlooked by developers – the Transients API. Sure, at the time you had started developing for WordPress, you first needed to get around in the system. But trust me, you definitely want to know how to use transients – because transients make your WordPress website faster. This is not only important to make sure that potential visitors don’t leave your site before it has even loaded, but also for SEO these days – Google & Co. put a lot of emphasis on your website’s page speed. The faster it loads, the better it possibly ranks. In any way, a faster page speed is better than a not-so-fast page speed. That’s why you need to use transients in your WordPress themes and plugins.
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How To Modify WP SEO Breadcrumbs For Schema.org

A day ago, Ian Anderson Gray from¬†iag.me¬†opened this new thread¬†in the Github repository for Yoast’s WordPress SEO plugin.¬†He surely isn’t the only one thinking about using Schema.org markup in WordPress (I do too!), so if you are also interested, you should join the discussion. In this article I will not tell you the great unique amazing solution for this. BUT – I will show you how to modify the WordPress SEO plugin (using filters only) so that the plugin’s breadcrumbs will be using valid Schema.org markup instead of the old RDFa markup.
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How To Improve WordPress SEO with Schema.org

Schema.org provides you a good way to optimize your website for search engines. SEO surely means much more than that, but the usage of Schema.org will improve your visibility to Google & Co. a lot. Have you ever, for example, checked out movie search results at a website like IMDB.com or Wikipedia.org? They will mostly show you additional information for that particular movie, such as a trailer link, a link to release dates, maybe user ratings for this movie (check out the tiny yellow stars there!) and sometimes information about the actors, the director and much more, depending on your search query – and the website’s markup with Schema.org. So Google is not that intelligent that they know what the website is about – you gotta ensure this yourself by adding Schema.org microdata. While it does not directly improve your website’s rankings, the search results for your page will certainly look more appealing to users since additional information will be included.
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